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Source of mineralization for supragingival calculus

# The source of mineralization for supragingival calculus is:
A. Desquamated epithelial cells
B. Gingival crevicular fluid
C. Phosphatases formed by bacterial plaque
D. Saliva


The correct answer is D. Saliva.

Calculus is dental plaque that has undergone mineralization. It forms on the surfaces of
natural teeth and dental prostheses. Saliva is the source of mineralization for supragingival
calculus, whereas the serum transudate called gingival crevicular fluid furnishes the minerals
for subgingival calculus.

• Supragingival calculus: is located coronal to the gingival margin. ft is usually white or
pale yellow in color and is hard with a claylike consistency. It is easily removed by professional
cleaning. The two most common locations for supragingival calculus to develop are the buccal surfaces of the maxillary molars and the lingual surfaces of the mandibular anterior teeth. Saliva from the parotid gland flows over the facial surfaces of the maxillary molars through Stensen's duct, whereas the orifices of Wharton's duct and Bartholin's duct empty onto the lingual surfaces of the mandibular incisors from the submandibular and sublingual glands, respectively.

• Subgingival calculus: is located below the crest of the marginal gingiva. lt is typically hard and dense and frequently appears dark brown or greenish-black (due to exposure to gingival crevicular fluid) while being firmly attached to the tooth surface.

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